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Chicken stock or broth? The best of both worlds - Chicken Stroth - Recipe - Building Blocks of Cooking

Basic Ingredients to a Chicken Stock — by David Smith
Basic Ingredients to a Chicken Stock — by David Smith

Chicken Stock or Chicken Broth

I use a similar recipe to make my Chicken Soup. With that recipe I like whole chicken and plenty of meat. However, with this recipe I am looking to isolate the best flavors and for that I believe dark meat pieces of the chicken are best. These are the boney and meaty pieces of the chicken like the thigh or leg or both. But not necessarily the wing because of the lack of meat and plentiful fatty skin.

Chickens Thighs - Oh my! — by David Smith
Chickens Thighs - Oh my! — by David Smith

Chicken Stroth

Look up the difference for stock and broth, the differences at a quick glace seem pretty narrow, bones vs. meat, long time vs. short time.

First and foremost, I want flavor in my dishes, as simple as that. I believe that most flavorful meat on the chicken is the dark meat. I believe that the most flavor comes from the bone. I cook bone and the meat for as long as I can.

If I have an hour to make a meal, then I am probably cooking chicken breasts for 30-45 minutes and am making something like a broth. If I have a day or two to plan and make a meal, then I am definitely making something closer to a stock.

And if I do not have time to go shopping, I am taking whatever meat I have, bone-in, bone-out, chicken, beef or pork and making Stroth.

Chicken Stroth Recipe

2 Chicken Thighs, Bone-in, Skin-on (Muslo entero de pollo)

1 Medium-sized Carrot (Zanahoria)

1 Medium White Onion (Cebolla)

2 Stalks Celery with Leaf (Apio Entero)

About 3 Quarts of Water (Agua)

Chopping makes the Heart Grow Fonder

Make sure to wash and peel all of the vegetables. If you are washing the onion, then weird, if you are rinsing it after you peel it, then alright. Make sure to remove all of the outer husk of the onion.

Next, chop each of the vegetables into chunks. That’s right it’s chunky town. I recommend more than eight chops, unless you do not have a lot of time. If you are short on time, blaze through those vegetables chopping them into smaller pieces as efficiently and effectively as possible. If you have more time to let the Stroth simmer, then about 8 chunks per vegetable is good enough.

Simmering the Chicken Stroth

As I previously stated, cook the stroth according to the amount of time you have, longer is always better for something like a flavorful stock or soup. But if you don’t have a lot of time, cutting the vegetables will help this.

If you can break down the chicken this will help impart the water with more flavor and cook the chicken more quickly as well.

Simmer the chicken and vegetables for as long as you can on low heat. If you are short on time, turn that burner up and let it boil, but be careful and avoid too high a heat that can result in bubbling over. A recommended 30 minute minimum for both cooking the chicken and giving the stroth sufficient amount of flavor.

Chicken Stock, Broth, Stroth — by David Smith
Chicken Stock, Broth, Stroth — by David Smith

Finishing your Chicken Stock, Broth, Stroth

When the simmering is done, you should have a stock, broth, stroth that is a shade of gold, anywhere from a pale yellow to a deep brown-hued beauty. Usually, the longer you are able to simmer the stroth, the deeper the colors will be and the more like a stock it is.

Separating the liquids from the solids
Separating the liquids from the solids

Separate that vegetables and the liquid by putting it through a sieve (see pictured). If I was directly making a soup from the ingredients, I would have chopped the vegetables smaller. However, I am making this stroth to use for soups and stews.

However, lamentable it may be the vegetables are done and will be returned to the cycle of food life by being incorporated into my compost pile. The chicken however, can be deboned and used for other meals.

I suggest making large amounts of the Stroth, so that you can store it and use it when needed. If you plan to use it the next few days, store it in the freezer. Otherwise you can separate the Stroth into storage containers or even better, freezer bags and freeze them for later use.

One of these meals will be Chicken Mushroom White Wine Sauce (seen below), making use of the Roux and Stroth made here. See the Roux Recipe here:

This article was originally published on @talentedinternational