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Crazy Breakfast Foods from Around the World

Mett, or Hackepeter, as it is sometimes known.  — by Alex Simpson
Mett, or Hackepeter, as it is sometimes known.  — by Alex Simpson

Ah, breakfast, the most important meal of the day, unless you’re a Hobbit, in which case that would be second breakfast, wouldn’t it? Starting your day without eating breakfast, would be like going to the gym and not snapping a selfie, or heading out on a road trip, and failing to gas up the car.

With amazing breakfast ideas such as a traditional cooked English breakfast, American-style pancakes, maple syrup, and crispy bacon, and of course, a delicious bowl of fresh oats, we certainly have plenty of options in the developed world. But what about a little further afield? Which weird and wonderful delights do people in foreign lands like to start their day of to? Well, that’s what we’re about to find out. Here are some weird and wonderful breakfast foods from around the world.

Mett

Mett, or Hackepeter, as it is sometimes known, is a dish which many health inspectors would have a coronary over. The reason? It is a dish of raw minced pork meat. Originally of German origin, this raw minced pork meat dish is often served on freshly baked bread rolls as a breakfast food, though you can also find it at many a German buffet, no matter what time of day it is. In a quintessentially 70s way of presenting food, Mett was often formed into the shape of a hedgehog, complete with Olives for eyes and a mouth, and cabbage for spines.

by Alex Simpson
by Alex Simpson

Vegemite

No food is more divisive than Vegemite. Some of you will class this breakfast food as weird, while others will class it as wonderful. When we think of Australia, we often imagine enormous spiders, venomous snakes, koala bears, barbeques, and Foster’s lager. Nothing screams ‘home’ to a true Aussie however, than good old Vegemite. Vegemite was created to rival Marmite, which was made using leftover Brewer’s Yeast. Vegemite used this same process, with a few tweaks here and there, and it was not popular in the early 1900s. In 1930, it was branded as a health food, sales shot up, and the rest is history. There aren’t too many Aussie households that don’t start their day off with a thick layer of Vegemite spread over warm, buttery toast.

G'day, Mate — by Alex Simpson
G'day, Mate — by Alex Simpson

Congee with Century Egg

Next, we’re heading over to China, to tell you all about Congee. Congee is a form of porridge that is very popular at breakfast time in China, though it also serves as a great light snack at any time. So, what makes porridge so unusual? Well, it’s what Congee is served with that will turn heads: a Century Egg. Don’t worry, it isn’t actually one hundred years old, it gets its name because it looks and smells as if it is. Sounds pretty, unique, right? Well, once you get past the dark appearance and the pretty-foul smell, the egg itself is actually very tasty. The eggs are made by boiling them, and soaking them in tea, lime, salt, and wood ash, for a number of months. The velvety texture of the egg compliments the Congee perfectly. Oh, one other thing. You may hear Century Eggs being referred to as ‘Horse Urine Eggs’. Again, don’t panic, they aren’t actually made from that substance, thank goodness. It’s again all due to the smell and appearance.

This is Congee... — by Alex Simpson
This is Congee... — by Alex Simpson

Sprinkles and Toast

The Netherlands is famous for a number of things, including the delicious and simple breakfast food of sprinkles and toast. This breakfast food is basically a slice of toast, butter, and a generous layer of chocolate sprinkles, like those you get on ice cream. Some mix things up slightly and serve it with a few pieces of fruit, or even a thin layer of jam. The sprinkles themselves are actually much healthier than in other countries, as they are typically made from cocoa butter and cocoa, and that’s it.

Credit: http://www.foodspiration.com/2010/07/another-post-about-toast-sprinkles-from.html — by Alex Simpson
Credit: http://www.foodspiration.com/2010/07/another-post-about-toast-sprinkles-from.html — by Alex Simpson